Why the Friedreich’s Ataxia Scientific Symposium Is So Important

 

Every year, the Friedreich’s ataxia community comes together to discuss the treatment of the disease. Scientists, researchers, medical professionals, patients and caregivers all gather in an effort to learn more about FA and figure out the best way to work together to find a cure.

MORE: How CrossFit is helping one man with FA

In this video from USF Health, patients and doctors share a little bit of background about Friedreich’s ataxia and how it affects the human body. Patients explain why the Friedreich’s Ataxia Scientific Symposium, hosted by USF Health and FARA (Friedreich’s Ataxia Research Alliance), is one of the most important events for the FA community and why its continuation is critical as researchers move closer to finding a cure.

MORE: Research update: Treating Friedreich’s ataxia

Friedreich’s Ataxia News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

One comment

  1. Gwen Owen says:

    You inspire me so very much! I have a diagnosis of cerebellar atrophy, but as yet I do not have a more precise diagnosis. There are still more tests to be done. However, I have been hunting down information constantly about cerebellar atrophy, and ataxia. I do not know if we have the same specific diagnosis, but I suspect we are diagnosis cousins at the very least. I look forward to every notice that you are putting out another article or video. You make me feel so much less alone! When I am feeling depressed, I can read something you have written, or watch your videos and you make me want to fight for a cure too… for all of us. Thank you for giving me hope. Sometimes it feels as rare as this mysterious diagnosis. Thank you for the hope! Hope is where miracles are born! Peace and light, Gwen in Maine

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